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The New Features of Windows Server 2012

Netcom Training Microsoft Server 2012

Windows Server 2012, formerly codenamed Windows Server 8, is the next release of Windows Server currently under development by Microsoft. It is the server version of Windows 8 and the successor to Windows Server 2008 R2. This article tells the new features of Windows Server 2012.

Windows Server 2012, formerly codenamed Windows Server 8, is the next release of Windows Server currently under development by Microsoft. It is the server version of Windows 8 and the successor to Windows Server 2008 R2. Windows Server 2012 will be the first version of Windows Server to have no support for Itanium-based computers since Windows NT 4.0.

Windows Server 2012 will be a focus of attention at the event, of course, and it is nearing final release. In fact, at the conference of Worldwide Partner Conference in Toronto, Microsoft Official announced that Windows Server 2012 will be released to manufacturing in the first week of August.

Before it is released, what we need to know and learn is the new features of Windows Server 2012.
These are in addition to those I’ve already described in my earlier review of the Windows Server 2012 beta version — multimachine management, numerous Hyper-V improvements, improved security and others. And it’s worth noting, too, that the UI is still set to change by the time the software hits the “release to manufacturing” (RTM) stage, so I’ll reserve my final judgment until then. At this point, I still believe that Metro is the wrong way to go for a server operating system aimed at professional systems administrators.

Dynamic access control
In Windows Server 2012, dynamic access control (DAC) is a suite of features and utilities that work together to augment the file system security that has been a part of Windows since the NT days. It joins classification, policy enforcement, auditing and encryption as another way to protect all sorts of data from unauthorized access and tampering.

Additionally, you can create policies to restrict access based on the current department a user is assigned to (as opposed to explicit security groups that would have to be updated regularly). Finally, you could create a scenario where certain sectors of one organization could access only information pertaining to their work, a situation that is common in financial institutions.

You can also see instances where access was granted inappropriately and, from there, fine-tune your policy assignments to ensure those holes don’t happen again. You can also spot scenarios where users or groups attempt to access information (and are unsuccessful at it) — which is helpful from a security standpoint, since it shows where users need further education or consequences.

Theet are a lot of changes and new specifications of Windows Server 2012. For all that, what we are concerning now is Windows Server 2008/2003/2000 issues. For example, one of the most common issue or trouble around us is how to deal with Windows password recovery if you forgot or lost the login password for Windows Server 2008/2003/2000.

 

Posted in: Microsoft

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